Tag Archives for " Cyber counterintelligence "

Cyber Security Recruiter Video NextGen Executive Search

Cyber Security Recruiting Overview NextGen Executive Search

Cyber Security Recruiter

Cyber security recruiter video on staffing executives, functional leaders, and software engineers for enterprise, cloud, network, and mobile security.  

NextGen Executive Search lead cyber security recruiter team is retained or engaged by companies in North America to identify and place cyber defense and cybersecurity professionals working in corporate management, functional leaders, and sales, business development, software engineering, architects, and more,

Our cyber security recruiter also confidentially places cybersec engineers for cloud, network, enterprise security,, big data, private and public entities, cyber defense, warfare, analysts, and cyber counterintelligence including red and blue teams i

NextGen Executive Search Cyber Security Recruiter

Our staffing team of executive search consultants have expertise working for mobile networks operators, industrial automation and industrial manufacturing, robotics,  embedded wireless, public safety, financial, power systems, aerospace, medical devices, electronic health records, big data, defense contractors, and systems integrators, as well as cyber wireless and IoT data and devices security.  Our recruiting has identified and placed cyber security architects yo create algorithms and solutions to detect and thwart ransomware, malware, bots, cyber intrusion, cyber theft, and foreign cyber terrorism.

Cyber security executive search firms

Facing New Cyber Warfare Tactics – Implement CCI Methods

Facing new cyber warfare tactics

Facing New Cyber Warfare Tactics - Implement CCI Methods for IoT / Infrastructure

Facing new cyber warfare tactic

Cyberspace is an official battlefield for almost a decade in many states. According to a series of data breach investigations report (2013-2016) of Verizon facing new cyber warfare tactics, despite cyber criminals remain a major actor category in causing data breaches, the significant participation of nation-states and state-affiliated groups in cyber-operations is not to be underestimated.

The operators in the latter category do not simply target short-term monetary gain, but in-depth and persistent penetration to attain strategic objectives, notably the advanced persistent threat (APT). Our businesses, government, and military are facing new cyberwarfare tactics used in economic espionage, geopolitical campaigns and remote sabotage attempts. High profile events in recent years ranging from the Chinese APT1 eavesdropping over 140 international companies, Russian APT28 implementing asymmetric warfare against Georgia and Ukraine between 2008 and 2014, to the DNC email hacking in the recent US presidential election and Olympic Games (Stuxnet) sabotage incident in 2010, contribute to the rapid development of cyber intelligence landscape.

Methods in Facing New Cyber Warfare Tactics

Thus, in this troubled water, not only the digital assets and intellectual properties of private companies are under constant surveillance of ​cybercriminals but also public critical infrastructures and new Internet of Things connected data and devices are at stake. Highly skillful and resourceful actors enthusiastically collect intelligence through sophisticated hacking tools, computer worms and network mapping technologies.

This intelligence collection empowers malicious actors to succeed in striking companies and governments. One key underlying factor for successful risk mitigation is not only to catch up with the ‘hardware’ technological advancement, but also the software in facing new cyber warfare tactics to analyze the pattern, identity and objectives of the intruder so as to effectively counterstrike intelligence collection of the adversary.

Facing new cyber warfare tactics by implementing CCI methodsThus, adopting military doctrines such as decoy, deception and deterrence to detect and mitigate cyber risks becomes a valuable cyber counterintelligence (CCI) strategy for both private companies and states. In the tactics, techniques, procedures (TTP) guidelines implemented by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Joint Chiefs of Staff, at least four major intelligence collection methods can be identified in cyberspace. Intelligence can be collected through human (HUMINT), open-source (OSINT), signal (SIGINT) and geography (GEOINT).

Based on these notions, the security researcher, Robert Lee, suggests two approaches to apply these concepts in CCI policy making: defensive CCI and offensive CCI.

The former recommends regular red team assessment to evaluate both internal network vulnerabilities and external threat landscape. The latter is about setting up honeypots and sock puppets to interact with the adversary so as to achieve deception and delay effects. Both approaches require a comprehensive understanding of the internal networks, operations and procedures about one’s own organization. Ideally, one optimal CCI employment involves a mix of active and passive intelligence gathering to understand the potential adversaries.

Assessments in Facing New Cyber Warfare Tactics

In other words, it implies the hybrid application of conducting internal and external assessment as well as interacting with the intruders. Hence, the organization can be better prepared in facing new cyber warfare tactics by drafting its response plan and internal policies with more concrete scenarios, evidence, and more significantly, grasp of the tactics of the adversary.

In addition, internal analyst and general employee training is a prerequisite for the successful implementation of CCI strategy. On the one hand, improving the security awareness of general employees is an important, yet underestimated, means to prevent initial network compromise. For example, the victims of APT1 mostly started by falling prey to spear phishing which eventually caused successive large-scale data breaches. Educating employees to be cautious of unverified and false web information addresses the most vulnerable human factor in cybersecurity trust chain.

In other words, it implies the hybrid application of conducting internal and external assessment as well as interacting with the intruders. Hence, the organization can be better prepared in facing new cyber warfare tactics by drafting its response plan and internal policies with more concrete scenarios, evidence, and more significantly, grasp of the tactics of the adversary.

Facing new cyber warfare tactics CCI methods

In addition, internal analyst and general employee training is a prerequisite for the successful implementation of CCI strategy. On the one hand, improving the security awareness of general employees is an important, yet underestimated, means to prevent initial network compromise. For example, the victims of APT1 mostly started by falling prey to spear phishing which eventually caused successive large-scale data breaches. Educating employees to be cautious of unverified and false web information addresses the most vulnerable human factor in cybersecurity trust chain.

On the other hand, the training of in-house analysts has to be rigid and unconventional. They must be able to identify, evaluate and distinguish accurate intrusion data to defend the organization. Putting themselves into the adversary’s shoes is a crucial perspective to anticipate the interests, objectives and strategies of the intruder. It also prevents them from being misled to well-crafted falsified data.

To optimize the performance of the duties of in-house analysts, a number of emerging cybersecurity vendors in deception technology like TrapX, Attivo and Cymmetria develop products and solutions adapted to this specific need. Through setting up decoys and buffering zones such as honeypot servers, sandbox and other buffering mechanisms, the defending organization can maximize the counterintelligence efforts to study the attacker.

In conclusion, adopting CCI perspectives in facing new cyber warfare tactics is an imminent issue for companies and governments to cope with constantly evolving and sophisticated cyberattacks. After all, the information security solutions of major vendors in the market target a more general public having relatively less security challenges than institutions dealing with multi-billion digital assets, IoT networks, and critical infrastructure. Installing ubiquitous anti-virus/ spyware detection software is the earliest phase in defending one’s institution.

In case of constant aggressive network breaches that their existing cybersecurity solutions and internal policies are ineffective, even defenseless, against the adversary, it is time to consider integrating CCI tactics and perspectives into the institution’s cyber defense strategy.

If the states are involved in attacking private entities, for what reasons companies should not introduce CCI to their management?

Whether you are a manufacturer, hardware or software vendor, or defense contractor, you MUst have the best talent available who has a TSI and /or active security clearance to work in cyber defense and cyber counterintelligence.  NextGen has served companies with identifying and recruiting cyber analysts, red / blue / purple team engineers, and more.  

Cyber security executive search firms